Mushrooms started growing! Can’t wait to harvest them!

Mushrooms started growing! Can’t wait to harvest them!

Mushrooms started growing! Can’t wait to harvest them!

Mushrooms started growing! Can’t wait to harvest them!

sailoreverything:

svilorsvturn:

My Sailor Saturn tattoo. Done by Esteban Martinez at Third Energy Tattoo in Bakersfield, California.

This is gorgeous!

sailoreverything:

svilorsvturn:

My Sailor Saturn tattoo.
Done by Esteban Martinez at Third Energy Tattoo in Bakersfield, California.

This is gorgeous!

hxlxgram:

the more you look at it the more things move

hxlxgram:

the more you look at it the more things move

fight-0ff-yourdem0ns:

The kids face behind her is my reaction

fight-0ff-yourdem0ns:

The kids face behind her is my reaction

fraisecub:

Bees In Lavendar

I took these photos about a week ago on a beautiful, sunny day. Used a telephoto lens to capture the Bees sitting on the flowers. In full resolution photos you can see individual grains of pollen on their hairy legs!

I really loved that they Bees were yellow and contrasted sharply with the purple Lavendar, so I enhanced colours and lighting to make them pop against each other just a little bit more

ithehornedone:

BLESSINGS TO GREENMAN

1st Image: Natural Reactor (Great Link to GreenMan Inspired Music)

2nd Image: Phipps Conservatory

3rd Image: Faces of the Oak King From American Folkloric Witchcraft:

Names
Cernunnos, Green Man, Woodwose, Vindos, Pwyll, Freyr, Lugh, Apollo, Lucifer, Herne the Hunter, Karnayna, Faunus, Cern, Dianus, Sylvanus, Edric, Orfeo, Tapio, Dusio, Derg Corra, Green George, Jack in the green, John Barleycorn, Robin Goodfellow, Gwythyr ap Greidawl

Station of the Wheel
Southeast, Summer Solstice (Midsummer), June, Stone Castle, Mead Moon

Totems
Stag, Oak, Robin

Tools
Stone Bowl

Cernunnos in Celtic iconography is often portrayed with animals, in particular the stag, and also frequently associated with a the ram-horned serpent, besides association with other beasts with less frequency, including bulls (at Rheims), dogs, and rats. Because of his frequent association with creatures, scholars often describe Cernunnos as the “Lord of the Animals” or the “Lord of Wild Things”, and Miranda Green describes him as a “peaceful god of nature and fruitfulness”.

The Green Man motif has many variations. Found in many cultures around the world, the Green Man is often related to natural vegetative deities springing up in different cultures throughout the ages. Primarily it is interpreted as a symbol of rebirth, or “renaissance,” representing the cycle of growth each spring.

The wild man or woodwose is a mythical figure that appears in the artwork and literature of medieval Europe. Images of wild men appear in the carved and painted roof bosses where intersecting ogee vaults meet in the Canterbury Cathedral, in positions where one is also likely to encounter the vegetal Green Man. The wild man, pilosus or “hairy all over”, and often armed with a club. The image of the wild man survived to appear as supporter for heraldic coats-of-arms, especially in Germany, well into the 16th century.

There are several examples of the Romano-Celtic God Vindos maq Noudons which can be easily referenced within texts. Most deal with the root “vin” which means “light” or “white.”

4th Image: The Oak King — Cernunnos

The Beneficent Order of the Greenman

Brightest Blessings to You!

thewoodlinds:

Honey Fungi Domain by toosas
valkyriethais:

Circlet ‘Daugter of the Forest’ by Madormidera
thewoodlinds:

Flower-189 by josgoh
skeletonhaver:

ground control to major tom

skeletonhaver:

ground control to major tom

ladybonetiern:

Tinctures: The Basics

LBL Mod Additions: Modified format. No other changes made to the materials.

When making a tincture you are drawing the qualities out of the herb and into the liquid menstruum. These not only digest more rapidly into the physical body when used, but are an ideal way to preserve herbal components for long periods of time.
Menstruum:
Menstruum is a term used in reference to the solvent in which the herb is drawn into. Acceptable menstruums are: pure grain alcohol at least 75%, vinegar, glycerol, and distilled water. These are in order from the most to least effective. 
Alcohol: The most effective menstruum because it extracts alkaloids and volatile oils as well as breaks down most medicinal resinous materials. If you use an alcohol menstruum that is over 100 proof you will need to add distilled (non-chlorinated) water to balance the menstruum. Alcohol based tinctures should not be used by pregnant women, children, individuals with liver problems, or those suffering from alcoholism. Alcohol based tinctures can be stored from 2-5 years in a cool dark place.
Vinegar: Vinegar menstruums are effective at extracting plant alkaloids but they are not very effective at extracting acidic qualities from herbs. Apple cider vinegar is the most commonly employed due to a slight benefit in flavor, and the notable healing benefits it holds on its own. Vinegar based tinctures have varying shelf lives.
Glycerin: Glycerin is not a very effective solvent for oily or resinous material. It does however have more extracting potential than water. It is sweet, and often used in tinctures for children. NOTE: Glycerin for tinctures is not ‘sugar water’ it is usually vegetable based and can be purchased at pharmacies, whole food stores, or online. When stored in a cool dark place glycerin based tinctures can keep for up to two years. 
Distilled water: Herbal tinctures made with distilled water are the weakest of the tinctures. They do hold merit however, particularly for those who cannot ingest the other menstruums. The tincture will take longer than the rest, and it will need to be refrigerated for storage. The maximum life of a water based tincture is six months. Never use tap water, this has chemicals in it that will harm your product. DISTILLED WATER.
Light and heat:
Some herbals will instruct you to prepare your tincture in a source of light or heat, while others say to prepare in a dark cool environment. I go by the dark environment rule unless an herbal preparation gives direct instructions otherwise. In other words, 90 percent of the time you will be preparing your tincture in a cool dark place. Note however that some herbs benefit from the heat and you should notate this in any recipe that you may be using.
The moon: Herbal tinctures should be started on a new moon and completed on a full moon. 
Basic instructions for herbal tincture
1. Fill sterilized mason jar 3/4 of the way with well minced herb of your choice.
2. Slowly pour the menstruum of your choice over the herb, gently swishing it around as you go so as to allow it to settle. Continue to pour your menstruum until it rises above the herbs about an inch. There will be some room left in the jar, the herbs will expand slightly so this is necessary.
3. Store the jar in a cool dark place for at least 2 weeks. Woodier herbs will require a longer period of time. Also, if you are using distilled water the guideline is usually four weeks.
4. Gently swish the tincture daily, enough to move things around slightly.
5. Pour tincture through a non bleached cheese cloth to strain the herbal pulp. Gently press the pulp at the end to get the last little bits from them.
6. Pour the tincture into dark colored bottles, seal, label with the date and the herbs used, and store in a cool dry place.
NOTE: Be sure to know the herb that you are tincturing, read up on it well and become familiar with the properties of the herb, guidelines, and dosage recommendations.
NOTE: Always check tinctures before using: this includes checking the labeled date, and type of herb, and freshness. If the tincture has discolored or smells funny do not use it even if the date is within an acceptable time frame. It is better to be safe than sorry.
NOTE: This is a basic guideline, some herbs have a dichotomy of their own and will vary from the guide. For instance some woodier herbs take up to six weeks while others can be tinctured within the two. For the most part this guideline will serve you well. Use it as a reference but always do further research on the herb you are using in order to ensure the best end result.
[Originally Posted by lawsoffateherbal]

ladybonetiern:

Tinctures: The Basics

LBL Mod Additions: Modified format. No other changes made to the materials.

When making a tincture you are drawing the qualities out of the herb and into the liquid menstruum. These not only digest more rapidly into the physical body when used, but are an ideal way to preserve herbal components for long periods of time.

  • Menstruum:

Menstruum is a term used in reference to the solvent in which the herb is drawn into. Acceptable menstruums are: pure grain alcohol at least 75%, vinegar, glycerol, and distilled water. These are in order from the most to least effective. 

Alcohol: The most effective menstruum because it extracts alkaloids and volatile oils as well as breaks down most medicinal resinous materials. If you use an alcohol menstruum that is over 100 proof you will need to add distilled (non-chlorinated) water to balance the menstruum. Alcohol based tinctures should not be used by pregnant women, children, individuals with liver problems, or those suffering from alcoholism. Alcohol based tinctures can be stored from 2-5 years in a cool dark place.

Vinegar: Vinegar menstruums are effective at extracting plant alkaloids but they are not very effective at extracting acidic qualities from herbs. Apple cider vinegar is the most commonly employed due to a slight benefit in flavor, and the notable healing benefits it holds on its own. Vinegar based tinctures have varying shelf lives.

Glycerin: Glycerin is not a very effective solvent for oily or resinous material. It does however have more extracting potential than water. It is sweet, and often used in tinctures for children. NOTE: Glycerin for tinctures is not ‘sugar water’ it is usually vegetable based and can be purchased at pharmacies, whole food stores, or online. When stored in a cool dark place glycerin based tinctures can keep for up to two years. 

Distilled water: Herbal tinctures made with distilled water are the weakest of the tinctures. They do hold merit however, particularly for those who cannot ingest the other menstruums. The tincture will take longer than the rest, and it will need to be refrigerated for storage. The maximum life of a water based tincture is six months. Never use tap water, this has chemicals in it that will harm your product. DISTILLED WATER.

  • Light and heat:

Some herbals will instruct you to prepare your tincture in a source of light or heat, while others say to prepare in a dark cool environment. I go by the dark environment rule unless an herbal preparation gives direct instructions otherwise. In other words, 90 percent of the time you will be preparing your tincture in a cool dark place. Note however that some herbs benefit from the heat and you should notate this in any recipe that you may be using.

The moon: Herbal tinctures should be started on a new moon and completed on a full moon. 

  • Basic instructions for herbal tincture

1. Fill sterilized mason jar 3/4 of the way with well minced herb of your choice.

2. Slowly pour the menstruum of your choice over the herb, gently swishing it around as you go so as to allow it to settle. Continue to pour your menstruum until it rises above the herbs about an inch. There will be some room left in the jar, the herbs will expand slightly so this is necessary.

3. Store the jar in a cool dark place for at least 2 weeks. Woodier herbs will require a longer period of time. Also, if you are using distilled water the guideline is usually four weeks.

4. Gently swish the tincture daily, enough to move things around slightly.

5. Pour tincture through a non bleached cheese cloth to strain the herbal pulp. Gently press the pulp at the end to get the last little bits from them.

6. Pour the tincture into dark colored bottles, seal, label with the date and the herbs used, and store in a cool dry place.

NOTE: Be sure to know the herb that you are tincturing, read up on it well and become familiar with the properties of the herb, guidelines, and dosage recommendations.

NOTE: Always check tinctures before using: this includes checking the labeled date, and type of herb, and freshness. If the tincture has discolored or smells funny do not use it even if the date is within an acceptable time frame. It is better to be safe than sorry.

NOTE: This is a basic guideline, some herbs have a dichotomy of their own and will vary from the guide. For instance some woodier herbs take up to six weeks while others can be tinctured within the two. For the most part this guideline will serve you well. Use it as a reference but always do further research on the herb you are using in order to ensure the best end result.

[Originally Posted by lawsoffateherbal]

wiccateachings:

A date to mark in your calendar. There will be a total lunar eclipse on the Full Moon of April 15th. Sometimes known as a Blood Moon because the moon will turn blood red for a while. 


Ohhhhhh!!

wiccateachings:

A date to mark in your calendar. There will be a total lunar eclipse on the Full Moon of April 15th. Sometimes known as a Blood Moon because the moon will turn blood red for a while. 

Ohhhhhh!!